Posts Tagged Mossel Bay

Know the Job

Surely a Contractor Must Know the Job?

Wouldn’t you think a contractor, or a sub-contractor must know the work in order to be awarded a contract? Evidently this is not a requirement  any more.  How can a business award contracts, then hire someone else (who previously undertook the work) to instruct the new sub-contractors how to do it? Seems to me there’s something wrong with this equation.

To my mind, the contractor knows the work. He hires workers able to undertake the tasks, and instructs the workers how to do the job. Isn’t that the way it works. Apparently not. Sub-contractors get contracts without more than a very basic level of skill. I’ve had a welding team in the past month that may be OK to knock up a set of burglar bars or a braai stand, but have no idea how to run a weld for a pressure vessel. Hell, this so called contractor doesn’t even have an argon rig… they arrive on site with a couple of oil filled AC arc boxes – those kind you buy at Game or Makro.

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Do You Want a New Saltwater Angling Magazine

Please vote – multiple choice answers are permitted – choose whether you would like to be able to buy the magazine from a store, or to subscribe (Or both if you would like both options) and tell me where you live (AND FISH)

Here it is, one of my options for a new career.

Please help me to establish the potential for a new career related to my favourite occupation, FISHING by taking this survey.

Voting on this survey is totally anonymous. No personal details are collected. I will not be able to send you e-mail because your personal information is not required.

This survey is purely to provide me with an indication of the desirability of a new magazine to replace ESA Magazine (Read my post What happened to ESA Magazine).

FISHING is LIVING

Ray the Fisherman

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My Future in Industrial Contracting

Industrial Contracting
Industrial Contractor for 25 Years

I have worked in the industrial contracting sector for nigh on thirty years, first as an apprentice boiler maker and welder, later for myself as a subcontractor. The job has been good to me: I never expected to get rich, and definitely that is the case… but I have enjoyed the work, the camaraderie of fellow workers in this rough and tough industry…

I have had the opportunity to build a small succesful business, and have a core team of workers who are reliable mostly, some who have been with me a long time, one who has stayed through thick and thin  since I started out for myself.

Times Changing, Time to Change

I work mainly for a few prime contractors, one of whom provides about 80% of my work. It’s been a good arrangement, they procure the work, manage part-time workers, and take care of much work I would otherwise have to do – and spending time negotiating for contracts is time out of earning a living.

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Big Work Provider

Petrosa Plant in Mossel Bay

Petrosa: One of the Largest Work Providers in Mossel Bay

If anyone is wondering why I have not posted recently, the answer is simple: Three weeks of solid work have taken every minute of my time. I haven’t had a line in the water since the beginning of the month. Jen is wondering if she’ll ever get to have a meal with me again…

Such is my working life; days, weeks sometimes even a month or two with no work whatsoever, followed by non-stop 7 day weeks. This time it was one of the spin-off industries that developed from Mosgas/Petrosa. When I first arrived in Mossel Bay, there was not much in the way of large industry. Much of the industrial activity revolved around commercial fishing and the port.

How things have changed. The natural gas industry developed in the mid to late 1970’s becoming one of the largest employers and contributors to the local economy. These days it seems most of the work I do is in some way related to this industry.

Time now to visit the rocks, throw a few baits before picking up the good-lady at 16hoo (And trying to convince her to spend the evening with a rod in her hands!)

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Galjoen – A Rare Catch

Galjoen - A South African Fish

Galjoen - A Rare Catch

Galjoen, a fish we don’t see too often any more. Coracinus capensis is South Africa’s national fish. Found only along our coastline, galjoen are very vulnerable to over exploitation, and are now a restricted catch. Strong fighters, galjoen are great to catch using light tackle.

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Leervis at Cape St Francis

Leervis at Cape St Francis

Leervis (Lichia Amia)

This is my first post for several days. Busy making a living, and trying to snatch a few hours making living enjoyable – fishing…

The Cape St Francis adventure was enjoyed. Fishing was not outstanding, and the weather, well let’s just say it could have been better. However the extended weekend was a good break from local life, and may be the last time I can do one of these expeditions until next year.

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Great White Shark Poacher in Mossel Bay

Great White Poaching in Mossel Bay

Great white shark

Great White Shark (Wikipedia)

Responsible fishermen hooking a GW, or indeed any shark, will try very hard not to cause injury, and to ensure a successful release. Yes, anglers do sometimes hook Great White Sharks when fishing for other species – that cannot be helped. It has happened to me.

As a fisherman I know just how hard it can be to land a shark, or any fish of this size when angling from the rocks. The claim the shark was “washed onto the rocks by a wave” is nonsense

Even if circumstances had been as Mr Becker describes, the thing to do would have been to return the shark to the water immediately.

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Back Home

Yes, I’m back home. We got back a few hours ago after a weekend of hard fishing. Jen and I decided to stay over last night “because we could”, and have last day here in Cape St Francis. I would have liked to spend another day or 2, but I have to meet a client tomorrow. The things we have to do so we can fish!

I left home on Friday morning with an intention to update this blog daily. Instead I only churned out a single post on Saturday on the borrowed laptop. Since then I have been fishing almost continuously. I really am fortunate to be partnered to a woman who not only encourages me, she also enjoys joining in, even in the unpleasantly windy conditions these past few days.

Sunday was fair, weather wise. The wind dropped to a mere ‘strong breeze’, rather than the near gale blowing on Saturday, hence the hard hours of non-work. I have a few fishing stories to share over the next days as well as some more general subjects; not the least of which is Jen falling in love with a piece of land.

Right now though I’m thinking about the morning. The weather forecast is for light wind and partly sunny early on. I have quite a stock of fresh squid to try, and a few other things from Commercial Marine in St Francis Bay. My meeting is for late morning, so there will be ample time to ‘wet a line’. So I’m going to say goodnight, finish unpacking the bakkie, and get things sorted out, ready for an early start.

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October Fishing at Cape St Francis

Windy sea seen from lighthouse at seal point

Fishing near Seal Point Lighthouse at Cape St Francis

Cape St Francis October 15

We arrived at Cape St Francis on Friday morning just after 9 A.M. and checked into the Seal Point Resort. Quite a strong wind blowing – nothing unusual, every time I fish here the wind is howling.

Today the sun rose on a windswept seascape, around 15 to 18 knots, steadily increasing throughout the day, and now it is really blowing, at least 25 knots, although it seems much harder on at the water’s edge. Read the rest of this entry »

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Point Fishing and Kob

The Point, Mossel Bay

Fishing Rocks at The Point

Fishing here is hard. Getting to the spots needs a combination of mountaineering skills and pack-horse stamina. Landing a good size fish off these rocks can be very difficult as well. Many fisherman have injured themselves, or worse, trying to get a large Kob or shark out of the water, or just trying to free line and tackle caught up in the rocks.

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